She was one of the most famous and influential psychologists of our time who, in her own words “invented media psychology.”  Dr. Brothers began dispensing advice on WNBC in 1958 and continued doing so via TV, radio, and in numerous magazine and newspaper articles throughout the rest of her career.  Joyce Brothers passed away two days ago on May 13, 2013.  I had the great good fortune to meet and photograph her on assignment for Hudson Valley Magazine in early 1993.

I was a bit startled when shortly after ringing the doorbell of her sprawling hi-rise apartment in Fort Lee, New Jersey, a woman in a bathrobe and slippers with curlers in her hair and not a stitch of make-up answered the door.  For sure I thought I was at the wrong apartment.  But, indeed, it was Dr. Brothers herself, totally unembellished.

Noticing my confused look, she explained that she waited for me to arrive before getting ready knowing full well that it would take me some time to choose locations and set-up lights.  Of course, she was a real pro, and had been to many more photos shoots than even I had up until that time.  It took me about an hour to prepare during which time she did the same, and a very successful and fun photo shoot followed.  She was a very lovely person and a joy to work with.

RIP Dr. Brothers.  Thanks for a wonderful photo shoot, and for your contribution to the world of psychology.

My photo of Dr. Joyce Brothers on the cover of the March 1993 issue of Hudson Valley Magazine

My photo of Dr. Joyce Brothers on the cover of the March 1993 issue of Hudson Valley Magazine

Hudson Valley Magazine inside text re Dr. Joyce Brothers

Hudson Valley Magazine inside text re Dr. Joyce Brothers

Dr. Joyce Brothers in her living room in Fort Lee, New Jersey Inside photo for March 1993 issue of Hudson Valley Magazine

Dr. Joyce Brothers in her living room in Fort Lee, New Jersey
Inside photo for March 1993 issue of Hudson Valley Magazine

 

100th Birthday

January 10, 2013

January 9, 2013 would have been the 100th birthday of our 37th president, Richard M. Nixon. In 1990, early in my career, when Mr. Nixon was still a septuagenarian, and I was…well I was a bit younger myself, I was given the great opportunity to photograph the former American president. The assignment was to create an illustrative portrait for The American Spectator magazine’s “Who Reads” ad which ran in each issue.

Although I was too young to vote when he ran for the presidency, I certainly remembered Watergate, his subsequent resignation, and the negativity which became a part of his legacy. For me, he was and remains among the most famous, and certainly the most notorious, person I’ve ever photographed. Mr. Nixon was also one of my best photo subjects, easy to work with, very accommodating, and very easy to direct. He was also quite the gentleman, kind, and made me feel so comfortable. Both his wife and one of his daughters called during the session. As he spoke to each of them, the expression on his face and in his eyes revealed a man who obviously had great love for his family.

So all politics aside, these positive impressions of President Nixon along with the images of a very successful shoot will always also be a part of his legacy for me.

Richard M. Nixon for The American Spectator magazine, November 2000

Richard M. Nixon for The American Spectator magazine, November 1990

On the Job

February 9, 2010

Corporate location photography, environmental portraits of people in their work environments. New York.

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more about “Corporate Location Photography“, posted with vodpod
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